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What's in Cleverly

Concept Building Weekly Online Lesson
  • Weekly Video Lessons
  • Kids will learn 1 strategy or concept per week
  • Guided by experienced and passionate math expert teachers
  • Master the technique of asking quality questions that leads to effective problem-solving

How Cleverly works?

One learning platform for all your math learning needs.

1. Enroll
2. Access Lesson Material
3. Watch Lesson Video
STEP 1: Enroll Your Child In Cleverly

  • Select a plan and pay online
  • Receive log-in ID via email
  • Log in to Cleverly LMS platform
(www.iamcleverly.com)
STEP 2: Access Lesson Materials

  • Log in to Cleverly platform
  • Access lesson materials
STEP 3: Watch Lesson Video

  • Watch lesson video at your own scheduled time

Why Cleverly?

Memorizing is NOT ENOUGH!

Have you ever wondered why even after daily math drills, your child still doesn’t score well in math exams?

And your child is completely lost when they see questions that involve critical thinking?

Word problems that are NOT difficult to compute BUT require thinking & reasoning skills to find the connections to even begin!

Purposeful Curriculum

Solve real life problems by utilizing mathematical reasoning skills to cultivate children’s critical thinking and strategy planning

See

Develop critical observation skills to identify key information

Ask

Master technique of asking quality questions for effective problem solving

Think

Build reasoning and thinking skills to generate possible solutions creatively

Decide

Nurture problem-solvers to have the self-confidence and clarity for decision making

4 key skills for effective problem solving

Inductive
Reasoning
Deductive
Reasoning
Visual Spatial
Thinking
Critical Inventive
Thinking
Inductive Reasoning skills allow children to recognise a pattern in a problem and to apply the correct strategy/concept to solve the problem, even the more advanced ones.
An example of an Inductive Reasoning question is as follows:
The following figures are made up of matchsticks to form the pattern below.
How many matchsticks are used to form Figure 15?
A child WITHOUT inductive reasoning skills:

Will be drawing out each figure until Figure 15 and then will start counting the number of matchsticks.
Children will get the answer of 61 matchsticks by counting 

Many children are taught to draw and count to find the answer during the lower primary school years.
This way of finding the solution is correct, but it is usually time consuming and prone to miscounting.

But when they progress to the upper primary years, such question would require them to find what is in a bigger figure number and yet, they continue to use the same draw and count method to find the answer. And that is why children normally will get stuck, and due to time constraint, they will not be able to complete the drawing. 
A child WITH inductive reasoning skills:

Will observe a pattern
  • Figure 1 is constant
  • Figure 2 is constant + 1 add-on (4 matchsticks)
  • Figure 3 is constant + 2 add-ons (2x4 matchsticks)

Will draw a conclusion-> Number of add-ons =  (Figure number – 1)
Figure 15​ = constant + (15-1) add-ons 
                       = 5 + (14 x 4)
                ​       = 61 matchsticks ​​
Cleverly builds inductive reasoning to students in their lower primary years such that when they are challenged with questions of higher difficulty in their upper primary years, they will be able to think and derive the solution effectively.
Deductive reasoning skills allow children to make an assumption based on facts given in a problem and using the same assumption to derive a solution.

An example of a Deductive Reasoning question is as follows:

Farmer Bill has a total of 8 ducks and sheep in his farm.

They have 20 legs in all.

Find the number of ducks Farmer Bill has.

A child WITHOUT deductive reasoning skills:

Will try to guess and check
Many children are taught to guess and check to find the answer during their lower primary years.
This way of finding the solution is correct but it is usually time consuming and especially when the ratio is far from 1:1.

But when they progress to the upper primary years, such question would require them to find what is in a bigger figure number and more variables, and yet, they continue to use the same guess and check method to find the answer. And that is why children normally will get stuck, and due to time constraint, they will not be able to complete the guessing.
A child WITH deductive reasoning skills:


Will make an assumption and then derive a solution

Draw a diagram​
Step 1 : Draw circles to represent the total number of animals​

Make an assumption: Assume all animals are ducks​
Step 2 : Add in 2 legs for each head (A duck has 2 legs)​

Deduce the solution: Use the remaining legs to transform a duck into a sheep​
Step 3 : Use the remaining legs to transform a duck into a sheep ​(Use the remaining 4 legs to transform 2 ducks into 2 sheeps) ​
Step 4 : Label the animals.​
Cleverly builds deductive reasoning to students in their lower primary years such that when they are challenged with questions of higher difficulty in their upper primary years, they will be able to think and derive the solution effectively.
Visual Spatial Thinking skills allow children to see pictures in whole or parts and manipulate part/whole pictures in their mind.

An example of a Visual Spatial Thinking question is as follows:

Find the height of the table.​
A child WITHOUT visual spatial thinking skills:

Will stare at the diagram and will be too clueless to even start
Many children will be clueless but will try to perform some operations such as 170-130 to guess the answer. This way of finding solution is baseless and might not be correct most of the time.
A child WITH visual spatial thinking skills:

Will move the diagrams in their mind such that the new diagram can help them make logical comparison
Step 1
Stack the Left Picture on top of the Right Picture​
Step 2​
Relocate the given heights to observe that it measures 2 tables​a
Cleverly builds visual spatial thinking skills to students in their lower primary years such that when they are challenged with questions of different settings, they will be able to think and derive the solution effectively.
Critical & Inventive Thinking skills allow children to combine several concepts together to derive the answer creatively

An example of a Critical & Inventive Thinking question is as follows:

Joel was holding on to 2 red pills and 2 blue pills, and suddenly there is a blackout!
Under the no-light condition, how can he pick out 1 blue pill and 1 red pill?
A child WITHOUT critical and inventive thinking skills:

Will starts scratching their head with nothing comes in mind
In total darkness, the pills will look like this. 
Just take any 2 pills and eat it and see what happens next. 
Many children will try to solve this question using the “trial and error” method. They will just take any 2 pills and then “see what happens.”
A child WITH critical & inventive thinking skills:

Will bridge math concepts to the problem to look for possible solutions creatively.
Applying the Math Concept:
Sum of Half of each = Half of Total
In total darkness, the pills will look like this. 
If Joel were to break every pill into half.
The pills will look like this.
When there is light, the pills will look like this.
Now he will have 1 red pill and 1 blue pill.
Cleverly builds critical and inventive thinking skills to students in their lower primary years such that they can derive the solutions using all the concepts they’ve learned effectively.